Your Guide to a Sweeter, Sexier, and More Sustainable Valentine’s Day

Profile of a person with cut out hearts just underneath their eyes

Gimmicks aside, Valentine’s Day is a holiday worth reclaiming and making your own. It’s an opportunity to lean into celebrating the love in your life (whatever form that takes) and we can’t think of any reasons why that is something to be frowned upon. The only thing about V-Day that we’re not so keen on is the amount of waste and consumerism that seems to go hand-in-hand with all the lovey dovey goodness. So, while traditionally you might expect to exchange a box of chocolates or a bouquet of roses, we’ve thought up some alternative ideas to make your day with your sweetheart extra special minus the waste.

How about starting with a fun activity? No, not that activity...yet.

FIRST, LET’S MAKE VEGAN CHOCOLATE TRUFFLES

A spin on the traditional Valentine’s Day gift, without any of the questionable ingredients and tacky velvet heart-shaped box. Making chocolates with your lover is way more fun, way less wasteful, and a great way to spend your day. Minimalist Baker has our favorite recipe that requires only two (!) ingredients and no-skills, leaving you with decadent truffles and a fun memory made together. Sounds like a win all around. 


DINNER FOR TWO, PICNIC STYLE

Skip the takeout and avoid the containers by opting for a living room picnic, complete with a blanket on the floor, something bubbly to drink, and a simple home-cooked meal like pasta, hearty salads, or curry over rice. Set the mood with a favorite playlist and beeswax candles (heart shaped ones, to boot!)... and don’t forget your fabric napkins, which add a touch of fanciness and can be reused endlessly.


LET’S TALK ABOUT LUBE

Before you let Valentine's spirit sweep you off your feet, make sure you’re prepared to have a sustainable sexy time. Your lube’s plastic bottle isn’t the only issue. Silicone (silica + water) has been found to bioaccumulate; once it enters the world, it never degrades or fully breaks down and has been found all the way in the arctic reaches. We probably won’t know it’s full environmental impact for some time, but until then we can do our best to avoid it and find suitable replacements that keep sexy time smooth and the planet healthy. Here are some alternatives:

DIY

As strange as it might sound, flax seeds can do a lot more than just add Omega 3s to your morning smoothie! All you need to do is boil one cup of whole flax seeds with three cups of water for about ten minutes or until the seeds become super soft. Strain out the seeds and excess water and store the mixture (which has a slick and gelatinous texture) in the fridge for up to a week. No bottle or preservatives needed and perfect for sensitive bodies!


OILS

For those of you who are latex-free, you’re in luck: all you need is a little oil. Coconut oil is the most popular alternative (we carry it in bulk!) because it doesn’t affect the vaginal pH balance for most folks, has a faint but delightful scent and flavor, and can easily double as a massage oil. Organic olive oil and almond oil are both suitable as well, for those who are less sensitive to pH changes. But don’t forget, oil and latex condoms don’t play well together.

GIFT WITH INTENTION

Forgo mass-produced in favor of intimate. Consider choosing gifts that encourage your loved one to relax and help them to feel seen and cared for, while also minding your waste and environmental impact. We tend to favor experiences over stuff, but sometimes it’s nice to spoil the one you love with a little something. 

Instead of a store-bought bouquet: A single picked bloom in a thrifted vase

Instead of a bottle of perfume or cologne: A relaxing bath bomb or eye pillow

Instead of jewelry or trinkets: Handwritten coupons for massages or breakfast in bed

Instead of a paper card: A plantable botanical card


Now, go forth and love yourself, each other and the planet well!  Happy Valentine’s Day from the Kindred team. We love you all very much!

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